Posted in Tudor Paintings

Symbolism in Tudor portraits

In the Tudor era, it was well known that a dog represented faithfulness and that the Tudors were represented by a greyhound. This hidden meaning would be as familiar to a Tudor as a car logo or a symbol for a top brand of shampoo is to us today.

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Posted in Places to visit, Tudor Medicine

St. Thomas’ Hospitals dark past…

There are many fascinating museums in London which are dedicated to the history of medicine. My favourite has always been the ‘Old operating theatre and herb garret museum’ which is located near the south side of London Bridge. It displays historic surgical instruments and hosts live re-enactments of grisly pre-anaesthetic surgery.

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Posted in Crime and Punishment

Being made a laughing stock was deadly…

The earliest recorded mention of the stocks being used as a form of punishment was 4700 years ago. ‘He puts my feet in the stocks.’ Job 33:11

The book of Acts is almost two thousand years old. It describes how the disciples of Jesus, were arrested and their jailer, put them into the inner prison and fastened their feet in the stocks. Acts: 16:24

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Posted in Movies and film

Lets play the ‘Tudor movie dream team…’

If  you could choose just one actor to play Henry and just one to play Anne Boleyn who would they be. You can choose whoever you want for your Tudor movie dream team…

 

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Posted in Sex, Tudor music

The hidden sexual meaning of the Tudor song ‘Greensleeves’ …

A real Tudor woman would not have been seen dead in a green coloured dress and this is why…

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Posted in Biographies, From around the web

The Death of Amy Robsart: Accident? Or Suicide?

A Fabulous post from Everything Robert Dudley…

All Things Robert Dudley

Lady Amy Dudley née Robsart is best known for falling down the stairs. The question has always been: did she fall, did she jump, was she pushed, or was her body arranged at the foot of the staircase after the deed was done? Amy Robsart was born on 7 June 1532 as the only legitimate child of the substantial Norfolk gentleman-farmer Sir John Robsart and grew up in a household of firmly Protestant leanings. In 1549, aged 17, she probably first met Sir Robert Dudley, who was exactly 17 days younger than she. The young people fell in love and married ten months later, on 4 June 1550. Amy’s father-in-law was the Earl of Warwick, later the Duke of Northumberland, the man in charge of the government of the young King Edward VI. Robert Dudley went to the Tower with the rest of his family after his father’s ill-fated attempt…

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Posted in Biographies

Kat Ashley: the Queen’s governess and greatest ally…

Princess Elizabeth began the year of 1536 as a ‘High and mighty Royal Princess’ and ended it as just another royal bastard. Her mother Queen Anne Boleyn was executed for treason and adultery on 19th May 1536 and from that moment her daughter’s world was turned upside down.

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Posted in Uncategorized

The Tudor Darwin Awards… Strange accidental deaths

Dr Steven Gunn has been trawling 16th Century coroners’ reports from 1551 to 1600 and researching accidental deaths in Tudor England. The results are both interesting and sad.

As far back as 1363 parliamentary laws insured that Englishmen spent their Sundays practicing archery with their Long bows. England had no standing army and archers could be needed at any time and come from all walks of life.

The coroners’ reports reveal that fifty six accidental deaths occurred by people standing too close to targets or by men collecting their fired arrows at the wrong time. Nicholas Wyborne was lying down near a target when he was hit by a falling arrow, which pierced him to a depth of six inches.

In 1552, Henry Pert, a gentleman of Welbeck in Nottinghamshire shot himself in the head with his own bow. Henry drew his bow to its full extent with the aim of shooting straight up into the air. The arrow lodged in the bow, and while he was leaning over to look at what had happened, the arrow was released. He died the next day.

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Posted in Tudor cookery, Uncategorized

Genuine Tudor recipes that taste good…

Mustard eggs:

1oz/25g butter

1 Tsp/5ml butter

1tsp/5ml mustard

1tsp/5ml vinegar

a pinch of salt and pepper

Eggs_with_nest

Boil the eggs for five minutes. Meanwhile lightly brown the butter in a pan and allow it to cool. Then quickly stir in the other ingredients to the butter. When the eggs are ready peel them and quarter them. Arrange them on a dish. Reheat the sauce and pour it over the eggs before serving.

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Posted in Mary Queen of Scots

The life of Mary Stuart: Queen of Scotland

As King James V of Scotland lay on his sick-bed at his Palace in Fife in 1542, his French queen consort was giving birth to their daughter at Linlithgow Palace. James had just suffered a bitter loss to Henry VIII’s troops at the battle of Solway Moss and aged just 30 he was a broken man.

Legend says that James turned his head towards the wall when he heard the news of his only legitimate child’s birth and said, ‘Woe is me. My dynasty came with a lass. It will go with a lass.’ King James was right his Royal House did end with a woman but that woman would not be his daughter because the his blood line did not end until a century after his death.

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Posted in Tudor Medicine

The mysterious Tudor epidemic that killed thousands…

In August 1485, Henry Tudor had just won his crown from Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth field. By October of the same year several thousand of his subjects would be dead of a mysterious new epidemic. It was called, ‘The English sweating sickness.’

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Posted in Anne Boleyn, Places to visit

The Mystery of the letter from the Tower, May 6th 1536.

Could this letter have been sent from Anne Boleyn to her husband, Henry VIII, while she was imprisoned in the Tower of London awaiting her trial or is it a forgery?

The letter in the British Library

A legend claims that ‘Anne’s’ letter was found amongst Thomas Cromwell’s belongings, In his rooms after his execution, in June 1540. The letter above is said to be a copy of Anne’s original letter which had been damaged.

Cromwell was the king’s Principal Secretary who many historians believe planned and arranged the fall of the Boleyn family and their friends in one foul sweep in May 1536. Cromwell certainly, gained prestige from the disgrace of the Boleyn family:

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