Posted in Places to visit, Tudor Medicine

St. Thomas’ Hospitals dark past…

 

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St Thomas’ hospital today

Saint Thomas’s hospital in London was founded in around 1106 and was named after Thomas Becket  who was made a saint in 1173. Becket was an extremely popular saint, who people believed had miraculous healing powers so he was a good choice to name a hospital after. Thomas was born in London in 1118 and became an ordained priest in 1162 and he later became an archbishop. Becket  began to excommunicate his opponents in the church and this angered the king, Henry II.

It began when three Archbishops crowned the heir apparent. It was common in medieval times to crown the King’s heir in the lifetime of his father to prevent disputes about the succession after the king’s death. This was in breach of Thomas’s privilege to fulfil this role and so he excommunicated the priests who took his place at the ceremony.

Becket was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral in 1170 by four of the king’s knights who misinterpted the King’s angry words, ‘Who will rid me of this meddlesome priest?’ thinking that it was a direct order to kill Thomas of Canterbury.

 

 

The site of St. Thomas’s death (Note the four swords above where Becket was kneeling in prayer)  and the marker of his shrine in Canterbury Cathedral

The early medieval hospital was named after Saint Thomas  and was run and staffed by Augustinian monks and nuns. The hospital performed three important functions. Hospitality was given to poor travellers and pilgrims, a home was provided for the destitute and aged, and the sick were nursed. Catholics believe that when they treat those who are despised by society they are in reality showing God their love for him. This is based on the teaching of Jesus in Matthew 35-40:

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Posted in Crime and Punishment

Being made a laughing stock was deadly…

The earliest recorded mention of the stocks being used as a form of punishment was 4700 years ago. ‘He puts my feet in the stocks.’ Job 33:11

The book of Acts is almost two thousand years old. It describes how the disciples of Jesus, were arrested and their jailer, put them into the inner prison and fastened their feet in the stocks. Acts: 16:24

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Posted in Movies and film

Lets play the ‘Tudor movie dream team…’

If  you could choose just one actor to play Henry and just one to play Anne Boleyn who would they be. You can choose whoever you want for your Tudor movie dream team…

 

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Posted in Sex, Tudor music

The hidden sexual meaning of the Tudor song ‘Greensleeves’ …

A real Tudor woman would not have been seen dead in a green coloured dress and this is why…

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Posted in Biographies, From around the web

The Death of Amy Robsart: Accident? Or Suicide?

A Fabulous post from Everything Robert Dudley…

All Things Robert Dudley

Lady Amy Dudley née Robsart is best known for falling down the stairs. The question has always been: did she fall, did she jump, was she pushed, or was her body arranged at the foot of the staircase after the deed was done? Amy Robsart was born on 7 June 1532 as the only legitimate child of the substantial Norfolk gentleman-farmer Sir John Robsart and grew up in a household of firmly Protestant leanings. In 1549, aged 17, she probably first met Sir Robert Dudley, who was exactly 17 days younger than she. The young people fell in love and married ten months later, on 4 June 1550. Amy’s father-in-law was the Earl of Warwick, later the Duke of Northumberland, the man in charge of the government of the young King Edward VI. Robert Dudley went to the Tower with the rest of his family after his father’s ill-fated attempt…

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